Last edited by Dushura
Thursday, October 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Workers self management in Yugoslavia. found in the catalog.

Workers self management in Yugoslavia.

Fred Singleton

Workers self management in Yugoslavia.

by Fred Singleton

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  • 34 Currently reading

Published by priv.print .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Paper read at National Association for Soviet and East European Studies Annual Conference.

The Physical Object
Pagination5p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13725935M

Bayat, Asef , Work, Politics, and Power: An International Perspective on Workers’ Control and Self-Management, New York: Monthly Review Press. Becattini, Giacomo, and Gabi Dei Ottati , ‘The Performance of Italian Industrial Districts and Large Enterprise Areas in the s’, European Planning Studies, 14, 8: – This may go some way towards explaining the ultimate failure of the self-management experiment in Yugoslavia: its extremely authoritarian roots in marked the practice of self-management outside the prisons, and it is particularly striking that, even in the s and s, bottom-up self-managing structures in factories and political.

The Partisan as an Artist, the Artist as a Partisan? On the Relationship between Artistic Autonomy and Workers’ Self Management was published in Partisans in Yugoslavia on page When Workers’ Self-Management Met Neoliberalism: Positive Perceptions of Market Reforms among Blue-Collar Workers in Late Yugoslav Socialism. Toward an Inclusive History of Work. Anca Glont Not Just Socialist Miners, but Miners of the World: Internationalism, Global Trends and Romanian Coal Workers. List of contributors.

The ideas of workers' self-management are still famously advanced by the IWW. History Edit. The most complete experience of workers' self-management took place during the Spanish Revolution (). Josip Broz Tito's Yugoslavia claimed during the Cold War to choose a socialist autogestion way, which led to his break with Moscow. This book comes to terms with Marxism and its relationship to workers' self-management. David L. Prychitko offers a reinterpretation of Marx's vision of socialism by arguing that Marx's understanding of the praxis-nature of humankind led him to a utopian goal of decentralized socialism based on the total abolition of market exchange.


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Workers self management in Yugoslavia by Fred Singleton Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book contains the Proceedings of a Conference held on January in Amsterdam on the problems and perspectives of Yugoslav workers' self management. The Yugoslav writers were selected according to the criteria that they are competent in their field and that they have different viewpoints in their assessment of the system.

This book contains the Proceedings of a Conference held on January in Amsterdam on the problems and perspectives of Yugoslav workers' self management. The Yugoslav writers were selected according to the criteria that they are competent in their field and that they have different viewpoints in their assessment of the : Springer Netherlands.

In this book Saul Estrin offers a comprehensive survey of how workers' self-management has influenced industrial structure and the allocation of resources in Yugoslavia.

The book will interest economists concerned with the likely impact of workers' participation and specialists in self-management theory and the operation of the Yugoslav by: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Gorupić, Drago. Workers' self-management in Yugoslav undertakings.

Zagreb, Ekonomski institut, (OCoLC) workers' self-management and the actual practice of self-management was noted One disparity was that of industrial democracy.

The question of whether the Yugoslav workers' self-managed factory is in fact more democratic than the capitalist factory is crucial in evaluating this general question Data were taken from a larger field.

Workers’ Self-management in Yugoslavia – An Ambivalent Experience. In the discussion of an alternative economic order the terms “producers’ democracy” and “workers’ self-management” are inseparably bound up with the “Yugoslav experiment”. The “Third Way” of Yugoslav socialism acted as an important point of reference in the debates of the international left.

Rus, Velko 'External and internal influences in enterprises' in Workers self management and oranizational power in Yugoslavia. Obradovic and W.

Dunn (eds.), Pittsburgh: Centre for International Studies. Google Scholar. summary. This book offers a refreshing new analysis of the role of workers both in Tito’s Yugoslavia and in the subsequent Serbian revolution against Miloševic in October The authors argue that Tito and the Communist leadership of Yugoslavia saw self-management as a modernising project to compete with the West, and as a disciplining tool for workers in the enterprise.

Yugoslavia, ‘co-operatives’ and worker’s self-management Published on 3 April, by preorg When I’ve talked about what a co-operative economy might look like I’ve had it said to me a few times that Yugoslavia, back when it was Yugoslavia, had an economy made up of co-operatives and that this experiment didn’t go very well.

Under Tito, then, the worker’s self-management system was meant, in its purest conception, to provide the opposite of a Soviet-type dominance over the worker ; the “new” Yugoslav worker, by contrast, was intended to have democratic control and a democratic voice in the daily activity of work.

In retrospect, five decades later, this visionary social management seems extraordinary. Read the full-text online edition of Workers' Management and Workers' Wages in Yugoslavia: The Theory and Practice of Participatory Socialism ().

Theory and Practice of Participatory Socialism (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, Workers' Management and Workers' Wages in and Self-Management - Vol. 2 By Raymond A. Russell. Get this from a library. Yugoslav workers' selfmanagement. Proceedings of a symposium held in Amsterdam, January, [M J Broekmeyer;].

This book was first published in For decades Yugoslavia had been developing its own model of socialism based on workers' self-management and the increasing use of the market mechanism.

As a. The basic premise of [Yugoslav] workers’ self-management is the decentralization of decision-making onto workplace and regional levels. As ofself-management was extended to the level of the various state republics which make up Yugoslavia.

The national Congress is the highest body. Request PDF | Yugoslavia: From Workers’ Self-Managed Market Socialism to the Breakup | Yugoslavia was a region of turmoil, divided not only politically by.

The Forgotten Workers’ Control Movement of Prague Spring In his book, Pete Dolack retells the story of the workers' council movement in former Czechoslovakia that sprang up.

The linchpin of this “third way” socialism was “worker self-management.” Tito was the anti-Stalin, a liberal decentralizer who believed in the “withering of the state.” Self-management meant.

After a series of discussions among the party leadership, Yugoslavia initiated a new form of social governance: workers’ self-management. I argue this was a sort of continuation of partisan politics by other means that constituted the second, internal rupture away from the command economy and excessive reliance on bureaucracy.

According to Janja Beč’s research, between 77 and 80% of workers thought that self-management was the best and the fairest method of development for Yugoslav society; between 95 and 98% thought that workers have to control the results of their work, while at the same time around 60% (in some cases even 84%) thought that self-management did not mean much in practice (Potts, Development.

The legacy of the country’s independent path to socialism, with its emphasis on workers’ self-management, plays a key role in this retrospective longing. Compared to civil war, ethnic cleansing, and foreign military intervention, it comes as little surprise that people look back favorably on the period of stability, growth, and peace over which Yugoslavia’s communists presided.

In Yugoslavia: The second Yugoslavia. new “Yugoslav system” was “workers’ self-management,” which reached its fullest form in the Law on Associated Labour. Under this law, individuals participated in Yugoslav enterprise management through the work organizations into which they were divided.

Work organizations might be either “Basic Organizations of Associated Labour” (the subdivisions of. Their bosses have told them to rebuild the turbines as they think best, in a gesture toward the Yugoslav system of worker self-management, but really because the .Worker self-management (or autogestion) is a form of workplace decision-making in which the workers themselves agree on choices (for issues like customer care, general production methods, scheduling, division of labour etc.) instead of the traditional authoritative supervisor telling workers what to do, how to do it and where to do it.

Examples of such self-management include the Spanish.